Architecture Patterns for Angular and .NET Core

Modern web application development is fraught with choices. There are many ways to build a modern web application. Some of the choices include: front-end architecture style (SPA, MVC, Razor Pages), front-end framework (React, Angular, jQuery), front-end build tools, CSS pre-processor, JavaScript build tool (Webpack, System.js, Gulp), and back-end architecture. Each of those choices spawns other architectural choices. Depending on what you pick, there could be several dozen decision points in the process. 
 
One of the things I like about Angular is that you don’t need to make as many of these choices. If you use Angular, you don’t have to spend hours searching NPM and Github for the different pieces of your web app. There are still choices to make though. In this post, we’re going to focus on how to integrate your front end (Angular) with your back-end (ASP.NET Core).
 
We are going look at three ways to build a web application. We’ll begin with the time tested monolith. Then we’ll move onto the shiny new “serverless” architecture style. After that, we’ll explore microservices architecture. After this post, you’ll have a good grasp of each of these styles and know when to use each one for your own applications.

Monoliths

If you’ve been building web applications for any amount of time, you’ve probably worked on at least one monolith. In a monolith, the entire application’s workflow is in one code base. In the .NET world, that means everything can fit into one big solution file. Monolith doesn’t mean we can’t have a reasonable separation of code. You can create module boundaries and separate your code into projects. You can even implement an n-teir architecture and separate your application into layers. The key to the monolith is that the whole process is in one self-contained code base.
 
Monolith architecture gets bashed on, but it’s the default for a reason. There’s several advantages to the monolith style. For one, everything is in one place. If you need to refactor, you don’t have to worry about moving across service boundaries. Tools like ReSharper make this even easier. Monoliths are also easy to deploy. If you are building a small or medium sized application, monolith architecture is a good choice.
While monoliths are fine much of the time, there are situations where they tend to fall down. The first problem with monoliths is that they are hard to scale. If you have one piece of an application that’s experiencing a heavier load, you still have to scale out your whole application. Monoliths also deter code reuse. In many corporate environments, there are resources that are used by more than one application. With a monolith, you end up copying the code to access those resources. Because there’s so much code in one place, larger monoliths can be hard to understand. This can make it harder to on-board new team members. Once your application gets to a certain size, you should peel microservices off of your monolith.
 

There are a few ways to implement a monolithic Angular application. The easiest way is to use the built in template. Visual Studio comes with an Angular template that includes some nice features. I prefer to use the Angular CLI, so I don’t use the included template. If you also want to use the Angular CLI, I have a post on how to use Angular CLI with a .NET Core project.

Angular CLI with .NET Core

As I learn more about Angular, I’m beginning to favor another approach. The truth is that .NET doesn’t add much to the Angular front end party. Given a clean slate, I’d run the Angular half of the code as it’s own project and use .NET Core for the API. Angular CLI is perfectly happy self hosting or you can deploy the static assets to an IIS site. 

Serverless

The serverless architecture is the most recent pattern on the list. It’s also the worst named pattern on the list. The servers [obviously] exist, but you don’t have to care about them. It’s “serverless” to you.
 
Serverless architectures rely on services that host and run your code for you. Instead of managing VMs or physical servers, the service abstracts that away. If 500,000 users come knocking on the door to your site, you don’t even need to push up a slider bar. The service scales for you.
 
When people think of serverless, they’re usually thinking about Functions as a Service (FAAS). FAAS platforms allow you to host small bits of code in the cloud. This means a single endpoint. FAAS is not the only way to be serverless though. Services like Firebase can encapsulate the your whole back-end.
 
Here’s a list of serverless platforms: https://github.com/anaibol/awesome-serverless
 
To integrate this with Angular, you compile your Angular application into a static web site. Then you call the APIs you create in whatever serverless service you’re using. This post has details on how to build a serverless Angular application using Azure Functions and an Angular site hosted in an Azure web site. You should be able to adapt these instructions for your favorite cloud provider.
 
Serverless isn’t for every situation, but there’s some definite advantages. The biggest advantage is that you can quickly get your code into production. You don’t need to configure servers or set anything up. You just drop your code into the cloud and go. Server level concerns like scalability and server management are gone. Serverless architectures are also very cheap to start with. FAAS platforms charge you by usage, so low traffic apps are dirt cheap. Static websites are also fast and cheap. Since most static assets are cached, you can serve a ton of users with very little impact.
 
There are a few problems with serverless. The big one for me is complexity. Once you have a certain number of functions, they become hard to manage. I’d rather have a web service or series of web services over a suite of cloud functions. Functions also have somewhat unpredictable pricing. A misconfiguration in your service or a bug can leave you with a huge cloud bill. The serverless pattern really shines when building prototypes and minimum viable products (MVP). You can get code into production and start iterating. Later on, you can refactor your functions into services if your application takes off.

Microservices

The microservices architectural pattern addresses some of the issues found on larger products. Microservices divide the functionality into tightly scoped services. These services are loosely coupled, so you can work on them independently. You can even build them using separate technology stacks.
 
Microservices architecture has several advantages. First, it’s easy to scale microservices. If you have one part of your application that’s receiving lots of traffic, you can scale only that part. Microservices are also easy to understand. Because they are small, it’s easy to drop into a new service and find your way around. Each service is easy to reason about. This is my favorite feature of the microservies architecture. Getting up to speed is much easier than on a big monolith application. Microservices also encourage reuse. In enterprise environments, you often have several applications hitting the same data. With microservices, you can make one service that serves many applications.
 
While microservices are great, there are some drawbacks. The biggest drawback I’ve seen is performance. Because the services are loosely coupled, you use JSON as a commnication mechanism between services. This means you end up doing a lot of serialization and deserialization. Each service boundary you cross incurs an overhead cost. On larger requests, those costs are significant. These service boundaries also make it harder to troubleshoot problems. Tracking down which service in a chain of calls is breaking down can be frustrating.
 
Another pitfall of microservice development is deployment complexity. Even though services are loosely coupled, you still need to manage the dependencies between them when deploying larger features. If you don’t have a good continuous deployment and integration pipeline, you are going to have a bad time.
 
If you want to see a sample microservices and Angular application, I have one here.

Conclusion

Each of the architectures in this post shines in a particular set of circumstances. Monoliths are great for small to medium sized projects, but are not ideal for larger applications. Serverless architecture is great for small apps, but not for large enterprise applications. Microservices architecture works well for large applications, but isn’t worth the overhead on small ones. Figure out the application you want to build and choose wisely. 

How to Build a Serverless Angular App on Azure

Building web applications is hard work. Not only do you have to build the application, you need to figure out where to host it. Ever want to skip all the frustrating server provisioning and focus on your code? If so, then serverless architecture is worth a look. In this article, you will learn how to build setup a serverless Angular app using Azure.

What exactly do you mean by “serverless”?

The term “serverless” is somewhat misleading. There are still servers, but you don’t have to care about them.

Serverless architecture runs on managed services that host your code. Server level concerns like figuring out how much memory you need, fault tolerance, and scalability are abstracted away. You don’t need to pick out a VM or service tier. The service scales automatically. You upload your code and go. The service takes care of the rest.

Serverless platforms come in several different flavors including APIs like Firebase and functions as a service (FAAS). FAAS is where you host small bits of code in the cloud. Think micro-services to the nth degree. All of the major cloud providers have some flavor of FAAS. Examples include: Amazon Lambda, Google Cloud Functions, and Azure Functions. You can even host your own FAAS using OpenFAAS, though that kinda defeats the point. (comprehensive list of serverless platforms)

For the purposes of this application, we are going to use Azure Functions for our backend API.

Where do we put the web site?

While Angular application are complex to develop, they compile into a handful of static files. There’s no reason you can’t throw these files up on any commodity static host. In this case, we’re going to use Azure Web Sites. While this solution isn’t 100% serverless, (you have to pick a hosting tier) hosting a handful of files on the free tier is close enough for me. To add another layer of performance, we’re also going to use Azure CDN to cache the files so they load quickly.

Roadmap

Here’s what we’re going to do:

  • Build an API using Azure Functions
  • Setup an Azure Web App to host our Angular application
  • Setup Azure CDN to serve those files more quickly
  • Add CORS headers on our function app so we can use it with our Angular app
  • Setup a SPA redirect to prevent unintended 404 errors

Building an API with Azure Functions

We start off by creating a new Azure Function app. Starting from the Azure Portal, click “New” search for “function” and click Function App. This will bring you to the new function app blade. Type in your app name (it has to be unique), add the rest of your info and click Create.

Now we’re going to make a function. Either hit the plus sign or click “New Function”. This brings you to the function template screen before. Functions can be activated by a variety of triggers including DB requests, files, and manual activation. We’re going to use the HTTP Trigger. HTTP triggers are activated by an HTTP request. Select “HttpTrigger – C#”.

You should now have this lovely boilerplate. This code can handle any http request and sends back a response.

Let’s ditch that boilerplate and drop in our API code. This is just going to be a simple GET request. Feel free to pretend we’re calling a database here instead of just returning a list.

If you’d like to test your shiny new function, click the “get function url” link and drop that into Postman. As you can see here, things are working splendidly.

You can also test using the built-in testing utility on the right side of the function window.

Setting up an Azure Web Site

Now that we have our backend setup, let’s put together our front end. In this case, we’re going to set up an Angular application built with the Angular CLI. Since this post is about setting up the architecture, I’m not going to go into great detail about the application itself, which can be found in this github repo. If you’re using another front-end library like React or Vue.js, this setup should be mostly the same.

To begin, create an Azure Web App. (New -> Web App). The free tier should be adequate for our needs. We’re just hosting a few files. If you want to use your own custom domain, you’ll need to use a higher tier.

Now we need to get the static files to host. If you’re using Angular CLI (and you should be…), the command to do this is:

ng build --prod --aot

After that command runs, head over to the dist folder of your angular app. It should look something like this:

The next step is to get your static files into the web app. I used FTP, though you can download a publish profile if you want. Drop your static files into the wwwroot folder. At this point, you should be able go to the URL and your app will load.

The next step is to set up a CDN. Since these are just static files, we can use a CDN to serve them. Azure CDN also allow us to serve the site over https without having to pay for a plan that supports SSL. To set one up, go to New, search “CDN”, click “CDN”, and click “Create”.

This brings up the CDN profile blade. Type in your name, select “Standard” for your pricing tier, and select your web site from the dropdown. Then click “Create”. Now you have a CDN for your static files.

Setting up CORS

Now that we have our web app in place, we need to set up the CORS (cross origin resource sharing) headers on our function. Browsers, by default, prevent your website from accessing APIs that don’t match the url of your web application (CORS error pictured below). This feature helps to prevent Cross Site Request Forgery (CSRF) attacks, but is sometimes kind of annoying. If you want to use your function API from your web application, you’ll need to add a CORS header to your API.

To begin, go back to your function app and go to the “Platform features” tab and click “CORS”.

This brings you to the CORS screen. Add the url/s of your web app. You can use “*”, which is the wildcard route, but you shouldn’t because it’s rather insecure. It’s best to use your web app’s URL here.

Setting up a SPA Redirect

At this point, we have a functioning web application, but there’s still one more issue to resolve. Like most SPA applications, Angular supports client side urls that don’t correspond to server-side resources. All of our application code is served from index.html on the root url, but we use the Angular router to map urls to parts of the application. For example, in our sample app, if we navigate from the home page to the Products page it works great, but if we hit refresh we get a 404. (error below) This is because there’s no page on the server for that URL. To fix this we need to add a URL re-write rule to redirect anything that’s not a static asset back to the index page.

To do this, we’re going to create a web.config file with our rewrite rule.

Here’s our rule (finished product):

This rule takes anything that isn’t a file, directory, or an asset (*.html, *.js, *.css) and redirects it to the index page. If you have fonts or images in your application, you should probably add rules for those file extensions as well.

Then, take that web.config file and drop it into the wwwroot folder of our web app. App urls should now redirect appropriately.

Conclusion

If you’d like to build an Angular application and host it for cheap in the cloud, this is a great way to do it. The serverless architecture is great for MVPs, simple applications, and proof of concept applications. It’s an easy way to get code into the world with minimum fuss.

References / Additional Information

If you’d like additional information or access to the code referenced in this post, check out the links below.

Demo Code

Cloud hosting for a static website

Azure Functions Docs

URL Rewrites in an Azure Web App

URL Rewrite Docs

Speaker Tip: Zooming the Chrome Tools Window

When doing a technology demo, it’s important that everyone in the room can see your screen. This usually means bumping up your view to 150%-200% depending on the screen, room, and relative blindness of the people in your audience. I demo a lot of web technologies, so I find myself showing the Chrome developer tools. Fun fact, when you zoom web pages in Chrome, that setting doesn’t apply to the developer tools. Fortunately, this is easy to fix.

TL;DR

To zoom in Chrome developer tools:
open the developer tools window,
hold down ctrl,
press + or – to zoom in and out.

Avoid The Class Hierarchy Jungle: Favor Composition Over Inheritance

Have you ever worked on an application with a jungle-like class inheritance hierarchy? Everything in the app inherits from two layers of classes and it’s impossible to follow a single line of functionality. You get code reuse, but at the cost of incomprehensible spaghetti code. I, for one, find that price too steep. In this post, we’re going to learn how to build code that’s easy to reuse, easy to test, and most important, easy to read.

Composition > Inheritance

We have many design patterns in object oriented programming. One the most useful ones is the composite reuse principle (aka. composition over inheritance). This term sounds a little opaque, but it’s not hard to understand. It means that you should design your classes as a series of loosely coupled components instead of using a multilayered class hierarchy for code reuse.

Here’s an example:

Practically speaking, this means breaking down inheritance hierarchies into plug-able services. Then you can inject those services using your favorite dependency injection framework.

Why Bother?

While using composition may seem more complicated, there are several advantages.

  1. It’s far easier to reason about the code. If you divide up your functionality into small components, each component is simple. You’re dividing up the complexity of the application into manageable chunks. When you’re using complex inheritance, it’s difficult to figure out what block of code is executing. This is especially true once you start selectively overriding methods.
  2. It’s much easier to reuse a single component than to glue a class onto a hierarchy.
  3. It’s easy to unit test loosely coupled components. Building the appropriate mocks to test a complex class is painful. Mocking a few interfaces is much easier.

Spotting Refactoring Opportunities

There are a few potential anti patterns to keep an eye out for. 
 
“Base<thing>” classes. Especially base controllers (MVC), base pages (on Web Forms), and other base classes for classes that process data. Base classes for data storage objects are usually OK. ( ex: An Administrator that inherits from a Person class.) Using inheritance for processes is a bad idea. 
 
More than two layers of inheritance. It’s hard to imagine anything that needs more than two layers of inheritance.
 
Ginormous “God” classes that span 1000’s of lines. While not strictly related to using composition over inheritance, this goes against the idea of building a suite of simple components. Large classes are difficult to read and to test. Flattening a class hierarchy into a “God” class is not an improvement. 
 
Base classes with only one class that inherits from them. The base class here is superfluous. Feel free to get rid of it. 

 

Conclusion

If you’re using class hierarchy for code reuse, ditch that approach and favor composition instead. Your code base will thank you for it.

Further Reading

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Composition_over_inheritance

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOLID_(object-oriented_design)

 

Cmder is the Cadillac of Windows Consoles

Like fashion, computing works in cycles. Things that were once looked at as passe come back with retro vengeance. For .NET development, the console is back. Consoles combined with lightweight editors like Visual Studio Code are becoming increasingly popular. Call me a hipster, but I’m all for this change. I hate waiting around for my editor and I never have to do that in a console or Visual Studio Code.

Unfortunately, if you’re living in the world of Windows, the default command line options are lacking. Not only are CMD and Powershell ugly, they lack basic usability features found in Linux and OSX. There is a better way. Cmder is a Windows console emulator that bundles several command line tools together into one fantastic package. It’s the Cadillac of Windows consoles.

Here’s what it looks like:

Cmder has a nice tabbed interface. You can run multiple consoles without having to deal with a bunch of windows. It also supports several different types of consoles including: CMD (enhanced with Clink), Powershell, and Bash.

You also get full control of the appearance of the shells including the font, color, etc… Cmder has many themes, but the default Monokai theme is good enough for me.

More importantly, you can create custom tasks. A custom task is a specific command window that you can define. You can specify the shell, what parameters it’s called with, and what directory is opened. You can have a command line setup for each application you work on. You no longer need to open a command line and manually navigate to your app folder each time you open up the console.

To make a custom task, do the following:

From Cmder, type Win + Alt + T. This takes you the tasks windows. You can also click the arrow next to the plus sign and click “Setup Tasks”.

This window allows you to reorder and reorganize the different defaults in Cmder. Hit the plus sign to add your own.

In this case, this is a console task that opens a specific project I’m working on.

After you setup your new task, click “Save Settings”. You should see your new shell in the list of available presets. Then you can open that exact shell whenever you want.

If you want to supercharge your Windows console, check out Cmder.

A Free Windows Tool For Recording Tests (Steps Recorder)

Documenting the exact reproduction steps for a bug can be a real pain. Some bugs need several specific reproduction steps. Even the most detail oriented tester can miss a step. Fortunately, there’s a hidden tool built into Windows that can help you out. It’s called Problem Steps Recorder. 
 
Problem Steps Recorder is an easy to use tool that will track your steps and produce a handy report. This report has information on each click and a screenshot for each step. It makes it easy to reproduce a bug.
 
Here’s a sample of what the tool produces: 

Problem Steps Recorder

To get access to this tool, type “psr” into your favorite command shell. That’ll open up the program. After the program is open, you can pin it to your toolbar. You don’t need to install anything, Steps Recorder is built into Windows.
The Steps Recorder app is easy to use. Click “New Recording” and work through your test. When you’re done, click “Stop”. Afterwards, you get a document detailing every step. This document can then be saved into a zipped mhtml file which you can easily attach to a bug report or an email. This document is better than a video because you can scan it quickly.
 
I’m not sure why more people don’t know about this tool. It makes recording test steps a breeze.

4 Tips For Blazing Fast ASP.NET Core Applications

I’m a huge fan of ASP.NET Core. It’s a great iteration on the ASP.NET platform and it should be your default choice for any new web development. I’m also a big fan of apps that don’t take a week to load. Fortunately, ASP.NET Core doesn’t skimp in the speed department. The framework has some great features for building fast applications. Some things that used to be hard are now easy.

In this post, I’m going to go over a few tips for building blazing fast ASP.NET applications.

Async Everything

 

One important way to help your application scale is to use asynchronous methods. The async and await keywords make building asynchronous code as easy as building synchronous code. Using async and await frees up your threads while waiting for calls to return. Because you are using up fewer threads, more people can use your application at the same time.

Async is usually a good default practice. But, it’s especially important when calling slower processes, like database calls and service requests. You don’t want to hog up a thread waiting around for database results to come back. When building your application favor async versions when they are available. Entity Framework has async versions of most data access methods, so make use of them.

One thing to keep in mind is that using async and await will help you scale, but it won’t run your requests in parallel. If you have several slow requests, consider running them in parallel using the Task Parallel Library. That will compress your wait time to the longest running call, as opposed to waiting for each one to return sequentially.

Cache Rules Everything Around Me

Getting data out of a database is the largest performance bottleneck in most applications. One way to reduce that cost is to cache things that are slow to retrieve or slow to change. ASP.NET Core has a few built in cache mechanisms.

The easiest cache to use is the built in memory cache. This cache stores items in the memory of your applications server. While this is easy to use, there are two downsides. The first downside is your cache goes away if your server goes down. Often, this is a non-issue, but if your application caches things are costly to calculate, this can be a real downer. The second problem is that if you want to scale your application to more than one server, your’re out of luck.

The solution to this problem is to use a distributed cache. This cache uses either a REDIS instance or a SQL Server table to hold your cached data. I’ve used both flavors and they both work great. One thing I liked about using the SQL Server cache is that I could add fields to the table to enable more detailed caching logic.

Regardless of which caching mechanism you use, you should hide it behind your own cache abstraction. (I call mine ICacheProvider) By using your own cache abstraction, you can easily swap out one caching mechanism for another. Most people start off with the memory caching, but eventually outgrow it. If you put your caching behind an abstraction, you can swap it out for a distributed cache without having to change a bunch of places in your app.

Crush Those JSON Responses With Middleware

By default, ASP.NET only compresses a few types of requests by default. These include the content of Razor pages, but not the results of api calls (JSON is not compressed by default). This means that if you have an api request heavy application (ie. a SPA), you can save some serious bandwidth by compressing those responses. This is especially important if you are serving mobile customers, who may have a low bandwidth signal.

Unlike the previous version of ASP.NET, Core has a handy built in middleware that you can add to your app. You can specify the type of compression and what mime types to compress. I’ve tested this in my application and the compression saves a noticeable amount of bandwidth.

Bundle Those Client Side Assets

Modern applications tend to use lots of JavaScript libraries, images, and fonts. Getting those assets to the client efficiently is important. Especially if those clients are on a low bandwidth connection. We rely on two strategies to minimize what we send to the client. The first strategy is bundling. This is where you take several assets and send them down in one request. This saves you bandwidth because you have less headers sent over the wire. The other strategy is minification. This is where you run JavaScript through a process that strips out any extraneous code, shrinking down the file size.

In the ASP.NET world, there are two paths to do this. If you are building a JavaScript heavy application, like a SPA application, use a JavaScript build tool. Webpack is my preferred JavaScript build tool. It can iterate through your dependencies and then bundle them into files. If you’re using Angular (2+), you should use the Angular CLI. It uses Webpack under the hood, but hides away it’s complexity.

The second way to do bundle and minify assets is to use the Bundler and Minifier Visual Studio extension. This extension compiles your client side assets on build. It is easier to use than JavaScript build tools like Webpack. If you’re using Razor views with a little bit of client side code, this is the way to go.

 

How about you?

If you have a good performance tip, feel free to leave it in the comments.

Speaker Tip: Warm Up Your Audience With Conversation

Ever give a talk when you walk up to the lectern and everyone is chatting and not paying attention? You end up wasting several minutes of your time slot while everyone settles in. It kills your talk’s momentum and makes it harder to get everyone’s energy up. You’re starting your talk in the hole.
 
This is an easy problem to fix. 
 
When you begin to setup your room, start a conversation with people in your audience. Try to get in right after the previous speaker leaves. That way you can setup your gear and still have plenty of time to schmooze. Start off by asking your audience to help you with AV. Most rooms are a little different, so you usually need to tweak your settings. (Bonus tip: Don’t wait until your presentation to adjust this stuff, that’s an amateur move.) “Is this text big enough?” “Can you hear me okay?” etc… If you do this enough times, you’ll be close, but it’s nice to get some feedback.
 
After you get setup, ask your audience more questions. Ask them where they are from. Ask them about their tech stack. Gather information for your talk. Use this information to customize your presentation to the people who in the room.
 
Have a bunch of Java people? Reference some of their culture or relevant technologies. Doing a web talk in a room full of web noobs? Spend more time on the basics. Have a room full of .NET people? Explain new concepts using familiar terms. For example, I use attributes in C# to explain decorators in TypeScript. Use local jokes and references. Ask people about their concerns and try to address them in your talk.
 
Make your talk a conversation, not a monologue. 
 
Ask people about previous talks in the conference or other conference activities. Specifically, ask them about talks they enjoyed. Besides being fun, it gets people to associate you with other good speakers. If you have a bunch of people from a previous talk, you can reference that talk in your own. This is also a good way to learn about new speakers or topics to check out.
 
There are other benefits to starting with conversation. Leading the conversation allows you to take control of the room early. That way, when your time slot begins, you’ll already have everyone’s attention. This maximizes your speaking time and the value you deliver. By leading the discussion, you can build energy. You can joke around with your audience and build a rapport. You can begin your talk with an engaged and energetic audience, which is ideal.

The next time you give a tech talk or presentation at work, show up early and start a conversation. It’s a great way to get things moving in the right direction.

R for .NET Developers: Why Bother?

I spend most of my time working with Microsoft web technologies, or as I like to refer to it, “.NET and Friends”. While I’m a big fan of the web, I’m always looking into new areas of development. One of those areas is data analysis. We are awash in data and learning how to process it is a valuable skill. Until recently, there wasn’t much in the Microsoft ecosystem for doing this kind of work. This isn’t a bad thing, but it’s nice to be able to use familiar tools to learn new things.
 
Fortunately, Microsoft has made some serious investments in the data analysis space. You aren’t going to be using C#, but Visual Studio now supports R. R is a language made “by statisticians for statisticians”. It’s one of the premier data science technologies and a great way to learn statistics. Microsoft also has R support in SQL Server.
 
In this post, I’m going to cover a few of the reasons R is worth a look. Even if you are not planning on donning the data scientist hat anytime soon.

The Power of Polyglot

This is sometimes forgotten in the .NET world, but different languages are good for different things. If you build web applications, you already know this. For example, if you want to build a modern web application, you need at least three different languages (JavaScript, CSS, and HTML). More likely you’re looking at six or more (JavaScript, Typescript, SASS, CSS, C#, HTML, XML, and Markdown).
 
Every language does certain things better. You should use the language that does the job best, rather than trying to shoe horn your language of choice. In the data analysis space, this is no different. The two most popular languages for data analysis are R and Python. While Python is a viable option (and supported in Visual Studio as well), R is purpose build for data analysis. You can do data analysis in either, but R does it with less code. 

In addition to the productivity benefits of using the right tool for the right job, it’s good for your personal development to learn new programming languages. The Pragmatic Programmer recommends learning a new one each year. Learning new languages improves your thinking and makes you better at your primary development stack.

Data Is The New Oil

“There’s gold in them servers.”

Data is money. Large companies are using the data you generate as a goldmine. Uses range from using data to optimize advertising to using it to make even more addictive products. In addition to user generated data, we also have the mountains of data generated by IOT devices. Sometimes we can use it for small gains, like using a Nest Thermostat to optimize your heating and cooling, but sensor networks can have a much greater impact.  We have access to more data than in all of human history. If you can figure out how to mine insights from that data, you will be rewarded handsomely.

If You Care About Truth, Data is For You

“There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.”

With plenty of data comes plenty of people using that data to manipulate you. Every political cause has a stable of statistics behind it. Even if they fall apart under scrutiny, people believe them because numbers sound fancy. People trying to sell you something use numbers to appear more credible. If you want to thrive in our data soaked economy, it’s essential to become data literate, so you can spot these manipulations.

R is for Learners

R has several features that make it a great tool for learning about data analysis. First, it’s really easy to learn. R is a simple language that you can pick up in a few hours. Additionally, R has an easy to use built in help system. If you need info on any command or method, it’s a few keystrokes away. R also has a lot of built in data sets to play with statistical techniques. This includes lots of popular demo statistical data sets that are well known in the statistics community.

Playing Nice With Others

As data analysis becomes more prevalent in the enterprise, you’re probably going to wind up working with data analysts and data scientists. Learning about some of the tools and techniques they use gives you common ground. It’s the same reason software developers should develop business and industry knowledge. Being able to connect with your team members on their terms makes you more than a run of the mill software developer.

Conclusion

If you’re an enterprise developer, R is worth a look. You can use R to learn valuable new skills using familiar tools. With a little effort, you’ll be able to slice and dice data for fun and profit.

To learn more, check out my post on R Resources

A Few of My Favorite R Resources

In an effort to improve my data analysis skills, I’ve been learning and speaking about the R programming language. Even if you don’t want to be a data scientist, (whatever the hell that means this week) learning some analysis skills can pay dividends. Data literacy is an essential skill in our data soaked economy and R is a good learning tool for analysis skills.

One of the harder things to do when starting in a new area is finding useful resources. It’s tough to find the digital needle in the web powered haystack. To make your life a little easier, here’s a list of the R resources I found to be useful.

Setting Up R

There are three paths to getting R setup on your machine. If you’re a Visual Studio 2017 user, the easiest way to get R is to install the Data Science workload in Visual Studio. This will get you the Microsoft flavor of R and R Tools for Visual Studio.

Installing R Tools for Visual Studio

If you’re not into Visual Studio, you can also install an R interpreter and R Studio. R Studio is a free R IDE. For interpreters, you can go with either the Microsoft flavor or the standard CRAN flavor of R.

R Windows Installer
Microsoft R (optional)
R Studio

If neither of those options work for you, you can also run R in a Jupyter Notebook. Jupyter is a web-based environment that makes it really easy to mix text and code. It’s used in many contexts including scientific research and virtual textbooks. To setup a local copy, start off by installing Anaconda. Anaconda is a data science environment that includes a plethora of handy analysis tools. After you install Anaconda, you’ll need to install R using the conda package manager. Then you can run Jupyter using the “jupyter notebook” command.

Anaconda Download

Commands:

conda install -c r r-essentials
jupyter notebook

Sites

R Studio Cheat Sheets
A collection of useful R related guides in PDF format.

R Tutor Tutorials
This site came in handy a few times while trying to find specific R issues.

Flowing Data
Flowing data has a variety of useful articles on R and other data topics.

Don’t forget about the built-in R help system. Prefix any command with a question mark and it’ll search the R documentation for you. (Example: “?kmeans”)

Books

I skimmed through a bunch of books on R, but the one I really liked was R: Recipes for Analysis, Visualization and Machine Learning. The writing was clear and the content was pragmatic. The task based format was easy to follow and implement. Another book that I used was R for Data Science.

R: Recipes for Analysis, Visualization and Machine Learning
R for Data Science
This list of resources is enough to help you get started in learning R. Go forth and learn how to slice and dice your data.

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